Support Nature Conservation Initiative from Virginia Treat of Treats Photography

Nature Conservatiion

“I want to share with you all a little bit about this initiative that I am working on throughout the year,” writes Virginia Treat in an update on Facebook. “We are now in process of planning out Theme #5 for the Nature Conservation Initiative (ALMOST HALF WAY THERE!!), that will be happening at the end of this month.”

Virginia Treat with Treats Photography is working on a Nature Conservation initiative. She has put together a team and over the course of the next year is putting together a photo book. The book will contain photographs combining nature with high fashion. In addition, the book will contain an written piece related to each image, highlighting the park or facility the image was taking at or representing. The funds during this prepurchase opportunity will go towards various costs associated with making and publishing the book. Cost include materials for costuming, publishing costs, travel expenses to various locations in Idaho.  Anything above and beyond will be added to the proceed donations as stated below:

The book, once published, will be available for online purchase. The team is also working with various facilities to have the book available in visitors centers, local shops and more. 100% of the proceeds from sales of the books will be distributed to the various nature conservation facilities.

The team consists of Amanda Woods with Woods on Fire Innovative Beauty, handling all aspects of hair and make up; Holly Taylor and Unique Irish who are assisting with the costuming of the project; Danielle Solberg and Abby Dee, who are assisting with location, communication and other key items vital to the project. Additional members of the team include Tiffany Larocque, Samantha Chapman, Chante Thornton Hamann, Susan Moore, Michael Strickland, and Cheryl Whale Blauer.

Visit: http://youcaring.com/natureconservation to order.

Virginia’s update continues:

Models have been chosen, location is secured, and the costuming is in the works. Here are some of the prints from theme #4 that are available for purchase. visit :http://youcaring.com/natureconservation to order. I will soon be posting all the available prints as we move forward. There you can also pre-purchase other items. The main item that will be available is the book. The book will include some really amazing photographs that we put together as well as information on why, the relationship with art and nature, and the wonderful facilities and organizations that help make ‪#‎Idaho‬ great and maintain that beauty for us all to enjoy and thrive. 100% of proceeds from the sales will be donated to a variety these organizations.

 

#‎MakeADifference‬ ‪#‎Nature‬ ‪#‎Beauty‬

The Chris McCandless Obsession Problem

Every year, scores of Into the Wild fans tackle a dangerous river crossing to visit the last home of Alaska’s most famous adventure casualty. Why are so many people willing to risk injury, and even death, to pay homage to a controversial ascetic who perished so young?

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EXCERPT from an article by:
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Ackermann, who was from Switzerland, and Gros, a Frenchman, had been hiking the Stampede Trail, a route made famous by Christopher McCandless, who walked it in April 1992. Many people now know about McCandless and how the 24-year-old idealist bailed out of his middle-class suburban life, donated his $24,000 in savings to charity, and embarked on a two-year hitchhiking odyssey that led him to Alaska and the deserted Fairbanks City Transit bus number 142, which still sits, busted and rusting, 20 miles down the Stampede Trail. For 67 days, he ate mostly squirrel, ptarmigan, and porcupine, then he shaved his beard, packed his bag, and started walking back toward the highway. But a raging Teklanika prevented him from crossing, so he returned to the bus and hunkered down. More than a month later, a moose hunter found McCandless’s decomposed body in a sleeping bag inside the bus, where he had starved to death.


Read the original story, “Death of an Innocent,” from Outside‘s Jan 1993 issue.
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This tragic story was told by Jon Krakauer in the January 1993 issue of Outside and later in his bestselling 1997 book, Into the Wild. The book, and a 2007 film directed by Sean Penn, helped elevate the McCandless saga to the status of modern myth. And that, in turn, has given rise to a unique and curious phenomenon in Alaska: McCandless pilgrims, inspired by his story, who are determined to see the bus for themselves. Each year, scores of trekkers journey down the Stampede Trail to visit it. They camp at the bus for days, sometimes weeks, write essays in the various logbooks stowed inside, and ponder the impact that McCandless’s antimaterialist ethic, free-spirited travels, and time in the Alaskan wild has had on how they perceive the world.

Read more.